Four Strategies for Increasing Home Efficiency

Electric, gas, and water bills are often hefty, leaving home owners struggling to pay bills or increase energy efficiency. Consumers are also becoming increasingly concerned with energy efficiency for reasons outside of slimming bills and saving money. Besides, who wouldn’t opt for a more efficient home, rather than a gas-burning, utility-chomping place of living?

Fortunately, several avenues to reducing energy inefficiency exist. Outlined below are several strategies for increasing your home’s efficiency, all while saving money and helping our green Earth.

Invest in a tankless water heater

Every home needs a water heater. For many years, hefty, sizable water heaters have taken up space in laundry rooms and basements, as well as raise utility bills. Tankless water heaters are relatively new developments, currently becoming more popular in homes around the world. These heaters are installed directly on walls, usually sticking out no more than three inches, if any.

Traditional water heaters must heat and reheat large tank-fulls of water throughout the day, resulting in energy inefficiencies. Tankless renditions of ever-necessary H2O heaters are slightly more expensive than their outdated, tank-holding counterparts, unfortunately. However, tankless heaters are certain to reduce any home’s energy usage as they only heat water as needed.

Trade out inefficient incandescent bulbs for greener options

Outdated, traditionally-used incandescent bulbs generally convert less than five percent of energy used into light, with the 95-percent remainder emitted through heat. Incandescent bulbs are, as described, obviously wastes of money. Also, these bulbs inherently, excessively heat homes as part of their nature. LEDs and CFLs help reduce lighting inefficiencies related to their outdated counterparts.

CFLs are cheaper than LEDs, although energy use between the two are comparable. Compact fluorescent lamps (CFL) generally reduce electricity used by 50- to 75-percent in comparison to incandescent bulbs. Often times, initial investments in CFLs are cheaper than less-efficient options. As if their benefits are not detailed thoroughly enough, CFLs last 10 times longer than their inefficient counterparts.

Crawlspace and attic insulation

Heated and cooled air from homes escape through all cracks and openings, particularly attics and crawlspaces. Spray foam insulation is usually the most popular for plugging gaps in subfloor areas and attics. Unfortunately for home owners, insulating these areas is difficult, time-consuming, and physically exhausting.

Clean Crawls is a trusted provider of attic and crawlspace insulation, cleaning, and restoration. This licensed, bonded, and insured company has more than 20-years’ experience in the Pacific Northwest, where the company still operates out of. Efficiency-minded home owners seeking lower utility bills can visit http://cleancrawls.com/services/ to learn more about their wide palette of energy-saving services.

Insulate windows

Windows often bring unwarranted, outside air into homes without even opening them. Hold a grill or cigarette lighter near cracks in windows to identify possible leaks. Caulk areas where unwanted air seeps inside, simultaneously raising utility bills. Also consider weatherstripping their edges or purchasing new windows to increase efficiency.

Increasing energy efficiency is an elusive concept for home owners, until now. Implement these energy-saving practices into your home and watch utility bills go down, and feel good about being energy-conscious. Also, keep windows and doors closed as often as possible, only wash full loads of clothes, and find more efficient space heaters and air conditioners to further increase home energy efficiency.