Thursday, 16 Aug 2018
Home Repair

A Beginner’s Guide to Casement Windows

There are lots of different types of windows, and if you are unfamiliar with the terms, it can be confusing to sort through them. If you’re looking to replace windows or specifying for a new build, here’s what you need to know about casements.

A beginner's guide to casement windows

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Windows for all

Some older properties may well have sliding sash windows, but in recent years, casement windows have been the most commonly used variety. A casement is essentially a frame containing a piece or pieces of glass that open on a hinge.

It’s a style of window that can be found in everything from country cottages to modern homes. Frames can come in a variety of materials. Early 20th-century buildings may have steel casements. Wood is probably the most common material, but aluminium and UPVC are also widely used. Casements are more common, so they are generally cheaper to fit than sliding sashes and other types.

Casement types

Casements from suppliers like https://www.firmfix.co.uk/windows/casement-windows/ come in a variety of styles. They can be flush with the window frames of the property – a style popular in older properties – or they can be rebated. Rebated casements offer improved weather protection, making them a good choice in exposed areas such as coastal regions. They can also help the visual interest of the property by avoiding a completely flat frontage. Rebated types have been the most common variety on new builds since around the 1960s.

A beginner's guide to casement windows

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Modern casements are supplied in a variety of energy-efficient materials that can help you to save energy and cut your carbon footprint. They also offer good security with built-in locking systems. A wide range of frame types are on offer, allowing these windows to be used in both old and modern buildings.

Casements usually open outward and can be hinged from the side or from the top. On upper floors, there is usually a restrictor to prevent you from opening the window too far, but this can be overridden in the event of an emergency. There are specialist types that allow the window to open inward. These and “tilt and turn” types are popular in flats as they allow you to clean the exterior glass from the inside. French casements – sometimes called French doors – offer an unrestricted view when open by virtue of having no centre post.